July 28, 2014

Whirlpool Drops Part of Patent Suit Against LG

Earlier this year, Whirlpool filed a patent infringement suit against LG Electronics.  Just last week LG announced that Whirlpool has abandoned part of its patent case against LG and the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) has issued a ruling to that effect.

However, the company voluntarily withdrew suits over two of the five patents in the case in May, and the ITC’s partial termination decision came in June, LG said. The three other suits are still pending.

“We submitted documents with the ITC which show the five patents do not belong to Whirlpool,” an LG Electronics spokesman told Dow Jones Newswires.

In May, Whirlpool also filed a suit against LG with the U.S. District Court of Delaware over the infringement of seven patents. It has now abandoned a suit regarding one of those patents, the LG spokesman said.

Whirlpool 30 Minute Recipe Contest

Let’s Eat In 30-Minute Meal Solutions Contest

Whirlpool brand and Newman’s Own, the experts in quick and easy meals at home, are looking for recipes. Submit your favorite 30-minute dish from June 2-July 31, 2008, and if it’s selected you could win a kitchen full of new Whirlpool brand appliances and a full year’s supply of Newman’s Own products.

To submit a recipe just click here.

How to Buy an Air Conditioner

It’s only June, but around here it feels like the height of summer.  Everyone is discussing their air conditioning or the lack of it.  If you are considering purcahsing a new air conditioning unit, we have some advice for you courtesy of the NY Daily News.  You need to sure the unit you purchase is the right one for you. 

The good news is that air conditioner prices have come down substantially in recent years as manufacturing has moved overseas, said P.C. Richard & Son president Gregg Richard.

“A unit that costs $99 today would have cost $149 five years ago,” Richard said.

Expect to pay anywhere from $99 for a small unit to around $1,800 for a jumbo-sized air cooler. Doing some homework before you hit the stores will help you make the wise choice.

How powerful an air conditioner you will need – power is measured in BTUs, or British Thermal Units – should be your first consideration.

A BTU is the amount of heat required to raise one pound of water one degree Fahrenheit. BTUs, which range from 5,000 to 36,000 for room air conditioners, measure the amount of heat a unit can remove from a room per hour. Generally speaking, the bigger your space, the more BTUs you will need – and the more you will pay.

Sizing it right is key. If you get a unit that’s too small you’ll regret it when the mercury soars. But a unit that is too big for a room will cycle on and off too often, using up too much energy while not dehumidifying properly.

To figure out the correct number of BTUs, start by multiplying the square footage of your room by 35, Richard said. Other factors come into play as well.

A kitchen will likely require a unit with more BTUs than a bedroom of the same size because of the heat generated by appliances. Likewise, you might want to crank up the BTUs in a room that gets direct sunlight. For help zeroing in on the right number, go to www.consumerreports.org, which offers a free sizing worksheet.

Energy Star units use at least 10% less energy than conventional models. On average, an Energy Star emblem will add about $40 to the cost of a unit.

To figure out whether your electrical bill savings will justify the bigger price tag, go to getenergysmart.org, the site operated by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, to find out how much you can save by replacing your air conditioner with an Energy Star unit.

“Buy the most energy efficient model you can afford,” advised Consumer Reports deputy home editor Celia Kuperszmid Lehrman.

Other considerations go into choosing the right model. In compiling its recent ratings, Consumer Reports tested factors like how noisy units were and how well they functioned during a brownout.

The Haier ESAD4066, which retails for $240, got Consumer Reports’ top grade among small models. The GE ASMO8LK, for $260, was the highest rated mid-sized model and the GE ASM12AL, for $350, was the cool winner among large air conditioners.

To save yourself a headache later, make sure you know where your unit will be anchored – through a wall or in a window – before making your purchase, and measure the space. If the air conditioner will be going in a window, make note of the type of window it is.

Check the electrical power supply in your room too. Smaller air conditioners will work with a standard 115-volt outlet. Units above 8,000 BTUs will require a dedicated line, though Friedrich makes a 10,000 BTU unit that does not need one, Brief said.

Units from 10,000 to 16,000 BTUs are generally available in both 115- or 230-volt models. Units of 18,000 or more BTUs will need a 230-volt outlet.

How often you will need to buy a new air conditioner depends on the quality of the unit and how often it’s used.

“Many are warrantied for three to five years,” Vandervort said.

Sometimes people will change a unit because it is noisy or when they want to change the décor of a room, Brief said.

Another reason to head to the air conditioner aisles is “when you have an old one and it’s not working efficiently. You may be using considerably more energy than necessary,” Vandervort said. Otherwise, “use it until it doesn’t work any longer.”

 

Will GE’s Appliances Suffer Under a New Owner?

By now, GE’s upcoming sale of their popular appliance division is common knowledge and many people are wondering what will become of one of the most popular brands in the US when it is sold.  GE appliances rank highly with sources such as Consumer Reports.  When news that GE was considering a sale of the appliance arm, the magazine reported how various GE appliances stacked up against rivals. Most did pretty well.   GE had many highly rated (though a few poorly rated, including a ‘not acceptable’ in upright freezers ) models in many product categories and across price points.

According to the Wall Street Journal’s Deal Journal, for the most part, those considered to be potential bidders for the GE business–Sweden’s Electrolux, LG Electronics, BSH Bosch & Siemens Hausgerate of Germany, to name a few–match that. The outlier? Haier. Haier’s Genesis is No. 22, or fourth from the bottom in the rankings of top-loading washing machines and dead last in both large countertop microwave ovens (No. 15) and side-by-side refrigerators (No. 34).

The obvious question? Would a Haier-GE combination lead to an improvement in Haier’s own brand or would it pull down the reputation of the GE brand? Unfortunately, the question isn’t, well, academic. The folks at consumer-satisfaction surveyer J.D. Power & Associates said studying whether or how an acquisition of a high-quality brand by a lower-quality brand affected either brand would be nearly impossible, since it would be difficult to identify what was an effect of the deal or integration as compared with the myriad other issues that affect quality, like design, manufacturing, parts/raw materials.

Of course, Haier has has been down this road before, coming close to but ultimately failing to acquire another well-regarded U.S. brand, Maytag, in 2005. Then Haier’s plan was said to follow the Lenovo way, referring to the Chinese PC maker’s slow conversion of IBM Thinkpads to the Lenovo brand after it acquired the Big Blue business. For its part, Haier declines to confirm whether it was indeed bidding for the GE business or comment on how it would handle the integration should it comsumate a deal.

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GE Monogram with Advantium Speedcook Technology

The Monogram Wall Oven with Advantium Speedcook Technology has led the way in oven performance, harnessing the power of intense halogen light to deliver results in minutes with this exclusive GE technology. Today, the Advantium pushes the boundaries of culinary innovation even further with a  repertoire of cooking capabilities and enhanced design options.

Performance Capabilities


New Monogram Advantium ovens now offer four separate cooking modes:

Award-winning Speedcook technology delivers oven-quality results up to eight times faster than conventional cooking methods, with no preheating.

True European convection mode bakes, roasts and browns foods.

Microwave mode provides a fully-functioning microwave mode that allows fast, precise reheating and defrosting.

Warming mode keeps prepared dishes at ready-to-serve temperatures.

Enhanced Design Options with Larger Interiors

The  performance capabilities are matched by the bold exteriors, which complement other Monogram cooking products:

Integrated-style models make an architectural impression with sleek, horizontal lines set off by tubular handles and a machined stainless steel control knob.

Professional-style modelsare designed with chamfered edges and a robust, die-cast control knob.

Glass touch controls, stainless steel vent/grille and an expansive viewing window on each model.

Larger interior cavity easily accommodates roasts or casserole dishes on a 16-inch diameter tray that holds a 9-by-13-inch pan, while the addition of a removable rack allows for multi-level convection baking.

Monogram Advantium ovens with integrated styling are offered in stainless steel (ZSC2201NSS), black (ZSC2200NBB) and white (ZSC2200WBB). Professional models are available in premium-grade stainless steel (ZSC2202NSS).

Ellen and the Vacuum Kid

Tips for Saving Money and Energy Around the House

Looking for ways to save money? Look no further than your kitchen. The Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) offers these simple energy savings tips to consumers looking for ways to cut energy bills this summer.

The energy consumed by home appliances has dropped sharply since 2000.
Refrigerators, dishwashers and clothes washers combined account for a 43% decrease in
energy consumption since 2000. Replacing an eight year old refrigerator, dishwasher and
clothes washer with new appliances of average efficiency will save consumers about
$95.00 per year in energy bills. Replacing an eight year old clothes washer will save
more than $60.00 in electricity costs and nearly 5,000 gallons of water per year.
Additional savings can be obtained by purchasing Energy Star appliances.

Energy savings can also be obtained by following these easy tips:

• If you are replacing your refrigerator, do not use the old refrigerator as a second
refrigerator. This will not yield energy savings. Properly recycle the appliance.
To find recycling options in your area, call 1-800-YES-1-CAN.

• Allow hot foods to cool before placing them in the refrigerator; and always cover
foods that may release moisture in the refrigerator.

• Limit opening the refrigerator and freezer doors. Label foods or use clear food
storage bags to easily identify foods.

• Scrape, but do not pre-rinse dishes before putting them in the dishwasher.
Dishwashers do a great job of cleaning soiled dishes.

• Take advantage of your dishwasher’s “eco” option that reduces water use, or use a
no-heat air dry feature.

• Use load size settings- if you are washing a small load of clothing, be sure to
change the load setting. Use cold water settings whenever possible.

• Always clean the lint filter on the clothes dryer after each use. A clogged filter
will reduce dryer performance.

You can Thank NASA for Your Cordless Drill

If you plan to give Dad a cordless power tool this Father’s Day, you can thank NASA for the great gift idea.

According to Howstuffworks.com, Black and Decker created the cordless idea back in 1961 with battery operated tools, but NASA helped refine the technology that led to lightweight, cordless medical instruments, hand-held vacuum cleaners and other tools.

In the mid-1960s, to prepare for the Apollo missions to the moon, NASA needed a tool that astronauts could use to obtain samples of rocks and soil. The drill had to be lightweight, compact and powerful enough to dig deep into the surface of the moon. Since rigging up a cord to a drill in outer space would be a difficult feat, NASA and Black & Decker invented a battery-powered, magnet-motor drillWorking in the context of a limited space environment, Black & Decker developed a computer program for the tool that reduced the amount of power expended during use to maximize battery life.

After the NASA project, Black & Decker applied the same principles to make other lightweight, battery-powered tools for everyday consumers.