November 18, 2017

Archives for January 2009

Study Shows Consumers are Interested in Smart, “Connected” Appliances

In the not too distant past, it was the stuff of science fiction for people to have “smart” homes – those houses that lit up and co-ordinated timers, alarms, coffeemaker and dinner each day as you awoke in the morning and arrived home at night.

Today a study by Connected Home Research Council (formerly the Internet Home Alliance), the research arm of the Continental Automated Buildings Association (CABA), shows that the number of Web-connected households in the United States that consider the idea of a connected home “definitely appealing” has held steady since 2005.

One important finding of the study is that consumers would like their appliances to be part of this web-based system. Consumers are less interested in “automated” homes than having the appliances and electronic devices within their residences communicate and interact with one another.
“What consumers want most is an easy, seamless way to integrate their smart-home devices, their mobile device, their TV, their appliances, you name it,” said Whirlpool senior manager Carol Priefert.

Some findings from the study show that while many households have high speed internet access, not everyone is prepared to have their household appliances communicatiing yet.

Haier’s Compact Little Fridge

Haier is getting smaller and cooler with a new eco-friendly 1.7-cubic-foot compact refrigerator that features an advanced electronics and cellular technology cooling system called NuCool.

According to Haier, the new system achieves temperatures as low as 37 degrees, based on an ambient room temperature of 70 degrees, which was not attainable with prior refrigerant-free models. “Haier strives to be a pioneer in the implementation of new technologies in our product lines,” said Matthew Sekelick, the company’s compact appliances VP. “As a leader in compact refrigeration, we have looked to introduce environmentally friendly improvements such as NuCool that our customers desire.”

The NuCool compact refrigerator, model C-RNU1708, which shipped late last year, features an auto defrost and adjustable thermostat, a reversible door design, and full- and half-width door shelves with 2-liter bottle storage. It is available in black and white and retails for $80 at Wal-Mart.

The compact fridge is the first application of NuCool technology, Haier said. Larger-capacity models featuring the technology are expected to be introduced early this year.

Source: twice.com

Who Started it?

We are all so accustomed to having a microwave and dishwasher in the kitchen these days, but did you ever wonder who started it all?

In some cases the answer is Whirlpool, and they are proud of it.  Whirlpool introduced the first the countertop microwave and automatic washing machine. KitchenAid which is now owned by Whirlpool, brought us the automatic dishwasher.  Whirlpool also unveiled high capacity, front-load laundry units in the U.S.

Just a little bit of appliance history brought to you today by appliance.net.

Recall: Rheem Recalls to Repair Oil-Fired Furnaces Due to Fire Hazard

Name of Product: Rheem, Ruud and United Refrigeration Oil-Fired Furnaces

Units: About 14,000

Manufacturer: Air Conditioning Division of Rheem Manufacturing Co., of Fort Smith, Ark.

Hazard: If the furnace is not properly wired, the oil burner can continue to operate when the blower shuts off, posing a fire hazard to consumers.

Incidents/Injuries: Rheem has received one report in which the furnace was incorrectly wired. No injuries or property damage have been reported.

Description: This recall involves oil-fired furnaces sold under the Rheem, Ruud and United Refrigeration brands. Only the models beginning with the model numbers listed in the chart below and with date codes ending in 0106 through 5206, 0107 through 5207, or 0108 through 4808 are included in this recall. The model number and date code (designated by the four digits following an “M” in the middle of the serial number) are printed on the unit’s rating plate, which is on the left wall of the furnace’s interior just above the burner. The rating plate can be found by opening the unit’s burner access door, which has slotted openings.

Model # Brand & Description
ROBF Rheem Classic/Ruud Achiever High Efficiency Upflow Oil Furnace
ROPF Rheem Classic/Ruud Achiever High Efficiency Downflow/Horizontal Oil Furnace
TZOUP United Refrigeration “Thermal Zone” Upflow Oil Furnace
TZODH United Refrigeration “Thermal Zone” Downflow/ Horizontal Oil Furnace

Sold by: Contractors nationwide to consumers from January 2006 through December 2008 as part of installed systems for between $1,500 and $10,000.

Manufactured in: United States

Remedy: Consumers should immediately contact the contractor who installed the oil furnace to arrange for a free inspection and repair, if necessary.

Consumer Contact: For additional information, contact Rheem at (800) 577-3960 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. CT Monday through Friday, or visit the firm’s Web site at www.rheemac.com

Recall: Ryobi Corded Circular Saws Sold Exclusively at Home Depot By One World Technologies Inc. Due to Laceration Hazard

Name of Product: Ryobi Corded Circular Saws

Units: About 12,400

Manufacturer: One World Technologies Inc., of Anderson, S.C.

Hazard: The return spring on the circular saw’s lower blade guard can break, posing a laceration hazard to consumers.

Incidents/Injuries: None reported.

Description: This recall involves Ryobi corded circular saws with the following model numbers: CSB123, CSB133L, and CSB142LZ. Circular saws included in this recall have manufacturing date codes between 0836 and 0842 on the data plate near the trigger handle of the saw. Circular saws with a green dot on or near the data plate and on the outside of the package are not subject to this recall.

Sold exclusively at: Home Depot stores nationwide from October 2008 through November 2008 for between $30 and $70.

Manufactured in: China

Remedy: Consumers should immediately stop using the circular saw and contact One World Technologies Inc. to locate their nearest authorized service center to schedule a free repair.

Consumer Contact: For additional information, contact One World Technologies at (800) 525-2579 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, or visit the firm’s Web site at www.ryobitools.com

A Blonde Walked into an Appliance Store…

A blonde went to the appliance store sale and found a bargain.

“I would like to buy this TV,” she told the salesman.

“Sorry we don’t sell to blondes,” he replied.

She hurried home, dyed her hair, came back again and told the salesman, “I would like to buy this TV.”

“Sorry we don’t sell to blondes,” he replied.

“Darn, he recognized me,” she thought.

She went for a complete disguise this time. A new haircut and new color, a new outfit, and big sunglasses. Then she waited a few days before she again approached the salesman. “I would like to buy this TV,” she told the salesman.

“Sorry we don’t sell to blondes,” he replied.

Frustrated, she exclaimed, “How do you know I’m a blonde?”

“Because that’s a microwave,” he replied.

You can read more jokes at askmen.com

DryerMiser Promises to Cut Dryer Energy Use in Half

Here’s an interesting new twist on the clothes dryer:

A device that says it can cut dryer energy use and reduce drying time has passed safety tests and will be available this year.

The DryerMiser, developed by Hydromatic Technologies Corporation, changes the way the air inside dryers gets heated up. By using heated fluid instead of a gas flame or electric heating elements, the DryerMiser halves how much energy a dryer needs and can dry loads in 41 percent less time that typical dryers.

The device has recently passed tests by product safety certification organization Underwriters Laboratory (UL). Although the Underwriters Laboratory mark is not required for equipment put on the market, it shows consumers and companies that a product has met certain standards.

The DryerMiser will first be available as a $300 conversion kit that takes about an hour for a trained service provider to install, and the company says it is in talks with appliance makers to integrate it into new dryers.

Hydromatic Technologies also hopes its device will help put in place Energy Star standards for dryers. Although clothes washers can carry the Energy Star label, Energy Star does not label clothes dryers, it says, “because most dryers use similar amounts of energy, which means there is little difference in the energy use between models.”

This comes from GreenBiz,com if you want to visit them, click here.

Extend the Life of Your Appliances

One of the easiest ways to extend the life of your appliance is with some preventative maintenance. Don’t spend your hard earned money on new appliances when applying some of these simple tips can keep your laundry, kitchen and small appliances running smoothly.

Washing machine – Make sure this is set up on an even flat surface. Unbalanced machines cause uneven distribution of wash loads and may cause the appliance to “walk” or move little by little, which can eventually damage the barrel.

Don’t load your wash to above the maximum capacity. Every six months, check the hose for leaks and kinks, and replace promptly if needed as cracked hoses waste water. Periodically clean the lint screen by turning it inside out and washing it with soap and warm water to eliminate buildups. Check the hose vent for clogs.

Refrigerator – After delivery of a new refrigerator, wait at least eight to 10 hours before plugging in. Let the Freon settle down first. If you live in areas where electricity fluctuates, protect your fridge with an auto-voltage regulator (AVR).

Twice a year, clean the condenser coils located either at the back (for older models) or the front (newer models have grills that cover the coils near the bottom) of your refrigerator.

When defrosting freezers, never scrape ice from the walls to avoid damaging the appliance. Merely it turn off and remove all the food. Clean the refrigerator’s interior while you’re at it. To check the gasket, close the door on a piece of paper and pull. If it easily slides out, it’s time to replace the seal.

Air conditioner – Always follow the rule of starting the unit in fan setting for a minimum of three minutes before turning it up to high-cool to avoid overworking the compressor. Sustain airflow by cleaning the filter monthly with soapy water and a soft toothbrush. Wipe the exterior with a damp cloth and remove all debris from the central air unit to maximize air current.

Electric fan – Once a week, remove and clean the blade and grills. If you are adept at dismantling things, you can remove the shaft and apply industrial grease/oil to postpone wear and tear of the bushing parts. Let the grease dry for about three hours before using the unit again so the oil won’t enter the motor.

Television and DVD player– Avoid placing the TV near a window where splashes of rain could damage the circuits. Wipe the exterior with a damp cloth. Clean DVD players using a commercial disk cleaner once a month and remember to wipe CDs thoroughly with a soft, non-abrasive cloth before playing. Take good care of the remote controls as well.

Microwave – Never put any metals inside and don’t let splattered food stay inside for long. Use only microwavable dishes for heating. Before cleaning, heat a cup of water with a teaspoon of baking soda in a bowl for three minutes. This makes it easy to wipe off all sticky food particles with a sponge or soft cloth right after. Don’t forget to clean the door gasket too.

Rice cooker – Dry the bottom of the pot before putting it over the hot plate every time you cook rice. Position the cooker on a flat, even surface. Clean up any overflow on the sides right after cooking.

Electric air pot – Always boil water at the correct water level. Avert or remove hard water deposits by pouring pure white vinegar just above the water stain. Boil in one cycle, leave overnight, then clean as usual. Remind members of the family to gently press on the controls so as not to damage the pads.

It may take some extra effort, but you’ll find the both savings and the piece of mind of knowing everything is running smoothly are worth it. You can read more here.