December 17, 2014

Jenn-Air’s Newest Refrigerator Line

Jenn-Air, is introducing a new collection of high performance built-in refrigerators; available configurations in the new fully-integrated flush built-in refrigerator collection include 36-inch bottom-freezer and popular side-by-side door models along with an industry-first 42-inch French door bottom-freezer model offering the widest interior space available in any flush refrigerator currently on the market.

Created with the design-conscious consumer in mind, the thinner exterior door provides a flush fit with custom cabinetry for a seamless exterior, while the interior features greater usable cubic space than similar flush refrigerators. High performance vacuum insulation panels help maintain energy and keep food fresher, longer. The articulated hinge is equipped with a multi-pivot arm mechanism for smooth opening and closing. This hinge allows the refrigerator door to swing beyond a 90 degree angle.

All refrigerators in the new line feature Advanced Climate Control Technology which allows customized drawer storage at lower temperatures than the refrigerator for highly perishable foods through independently controlled Advanced Climate Control bins. Four settings provide more precise control of different temperatures including deli, produce, meat and Quick Chill. The Quick Chill setting lowers the bin temperature below liquid freezing point for a period of one hour, ideal for quickly chilling white wine, sparkling water or other beverages. . An industry exclusive removable water filter conveniently located at the base grill is easily accessible and features PUR® filtering technology.

Launching this spring, style options include the sleek Euro-Style Stainless and the commercial look of Pro-Style® Stainless. Beginning this fall, the warm hued tones of Oiled Bronze and the contemporary Floating Glass in both black and white will be added to the collection and all finishes will be available with updated style options. For consumers who may redecorate frequently, the exterior panels of the refrigerators are designed as separate pieces and can be easily switched out with a different style panel without having to replace the refrigerator. The overlay model accepts custom panels and handles, allowing the refrigerator to blend seamlessly with existing cabinetry. The refrigerators are available in 36-inch bottom-freezer, 42-inch French door bottom-freezer, and 42-inch and 48-inch side by side non-dispensing configurations.

Newly Expanded GE Café Series of Appliances

The newest additions to the GE Café series include two counter-depth refrigerators, and a new electric range.

Refrigerators:

The counter-depth styling allows the appliances to blend seamlessly with the surrounding cabinetry, achieving a built-in look without the added expense of a built-in model.
The new counter-depth 25-cubic-foot side-by-side refrigerator is available with ClimateKeeper2™ technology, featuring a dual-evaporator system to create two zones of air circulation that help foods stay fresh. Because air is no longer circulated between the fresh-food and freezer compartments, the freezer’s cold, dry air won’t prematurely dry out foods, and odors won’t transfer between the compartments. Suggested retail price for this refrigerator is $3,249.

For home chefs who prefer the convenience of keeping produce and meats at eye level, GE will launch the 21-cubic-foot GE Café counter-depth bottom freezer with French doors. Now available with an internal water dispenser. Suggested retail price is $2,899.

Offered as a free-standing, slide-in range, the new GE Café Electric Range offers consumers without a gas line the ability to have a restaurant-inspired range. The range includes a fifth center burner and cast-iron griddle on the cooktop, a PreciseAir™ convection oven, and a double-oven configuration with a drawer that heats up to 450 degrees for added cooking flexibility. An optional stainless steel backsplash is available (model JXS80SS). The GE Café electric free-standing range (model CS980SNSS) will be available November 2008 with an estimated retail price of $2799.

Samsung’s Flexible Fridge

Samsung has a creative refrigerator idea. The Quatro Cooling Convertible Refrigerator allows the consumer to switch the refrigeration and freezing compartments as needed. If you plan to cook and freeze food in preparation for a big event just switch use to make room. The same applies to needing more room to cool drinks for a party. The unit has to bottom drawer that can switch modes at the push of a button.

The refrigerator is a french door style with each compartment controlled and cooled separately with its own evaporator and fan. The bottom two drawers adapt to become refrigerators as needed.

Here are some basic specifications:

Capacity Net Total 24.8cu.ft.

Dimensions
Net Width 35.7″
Net Case height w/ hinge 69.7″
Net Depth w/ door handle 33.1″

Cooling Features Cooling System Quatro Cooling

Freezer Features Icemaker

Exterior Features Display & Control Digital LCD

Color Stainless Steel

Thermador’s Freedom Collection Refrigerators and Freezers

           

The Freedom Collection features counter-depth 24” and 30” fresh food columns, and 18”, 24” and 30” freezer columns, including dispenser freezers. Additionally, the industry’s first fully integrated and flush-mounted three-door 36” bottom-freezer, as well as a two-door version, are available within the collection. Unique 18” and 24” wine preservation columns have see-through glass doors and an interior that can hold up to 98 bottles of both red and white wine in two separate temperature zones.

As a result of its ingenious design and flexibility, the Freedom Collection recently was awarded with a 2007 Platinum Award for Design Excellence (ADEX) from Design Journal and Gold Award from Appliance Design Magazine’s Excellence in Design Awards. Other notable distinctions include a prestigious 2006 American Kitchen and Bath Award from Home Magazine, and a 2006 Merit Award from Kitchen and Bath Business’ Product Innovator Awards. The Collection was also awarded with honorable mention in the 2007 Woman’s Day Specials Best New Product (KB) Awards.

Each Freedom column has its own compressor and evaporator to eliminate odor transfer and air exchange between the refrigerator and freezer – sometimes a concern with traditional models – and perfectly regulates the interior temperature with a variance of only 1.5 degrees. When combined, this system preserves “market fresh” foods longer. The collection is available in stainless steel or can be matched to existing kitchen cabinetry for a seamless, fully integrated look.

“You have the total freedom to design your kitchen any way you want with Thermador’s new column refrigeration. For example, you can place different sized fresh food and freezer columns side-by-side, or put the fresh food column adjacent to the sink for convenient access to your fruits and vegetables. The freezer can then go on the opposite side of the kitchen, right next to your oven, for easy thawing and cooking,” said Chuck Bryant, senior refrigeration product manager. “To preview all the different types of configurations you can have, we developed a special interactive software program that’s currently available online at Thermador.com for consumers and designers to plan their layouts featuring the Freedom Collection.”

In addition to the infinite design possibilities, Thermador’s Freedom Collection offers an unrivalled assortment of exclusive features, including:

 The unique Freedom® Hinge allows all the columns to be fully flush mounted to cabinetry – without sacrificing accessibility to the interior and the full extension drawers. In fact, the hinge opens the column doors up to an amazing 115 degrees. It can also accommodate a variety of custom panels up to 220 pounds in total door weight.
No longer will you have to unload a shelf to gain extra interior space. The fresh food column’s motorized Liberty ShelfT™ conveniently moves a fully loaded shelf of up to 22 pounds with the simple touch of a button. Thermador liberty shelfAlso available on bottom-freezer models.
The FreeFlowTM Air System (fresh food column) results in superior temperature regulation and air distribution that helps keep “market fresh” foods longer. Cool air continually travels the length of the column door, ensuring that these items are just as cold as those on the interior shelves. A carbon air filter also absorbs any unwanted odors for fresher and more hygienic food storage.
The freezer’s FreeFlow™ Ice System regularly rotates the filtered ice in the icemaker to avoid clumping, while the UltraClarity™ Water Filter dispenses crystal fresh ice and water. The external dispenser also features an exclusive pull-down flip tray that accommodates pitcher-size containers to facilitate bulk amounts of ice or water. The Luminous Light System™ features bright halogen light towers and spotlights that fully illuminate foods, so everything can be clearly seen while creating a beautiful interior look.

Rounding out these industry exclusives are a number of additional performance features, including a convenient digital display that allows for precise temperature adjustments; multiple specially-insulated compartments that keep delicate and perishable foods fresher, longer; and an adjustable toe-kick that can range in height between 4-7 inches.

The entire Freedom Collection is ENERGY STAR® qualified and is among the quietest refrigeration units in the built-in category. Models are available with an MSRP of $2,899-$6,999; wine columns have an MSRP of $3,899-4,399.

Choosing Kitchen Appliances – Refrigerators

Continuing now with refrigerators, we bring you part two of our series on choosing kitchen appliances.  The features that most people consider when looking for a new fridge are storage capacity, ease of use, price and hopefully energy usage.  One of the first things you can do to save energy when purchasing a new appliance of any kind , is to buy one with the Energy Star seal.  A 2007 Energy Star refrigerator uses at least 15 percent less energy than a standard one. 

HowStuffWorks.com, Consumer Reports and Appliance.net have some tips we’d like to share with you that will help clarify your refrigerator needs.

While you’ll find an array of refrigerator brands, only a handful of companies actually make these appliances, with essentially similar models under several names. Frigidaire, General Electric, Kenmore, and Whirlpool account for some 75 percent of top-freezer sales and, with Maytag, more than 80 percent of side-by-side purchases.
You can still get the basic 18-cubic-foot, freezer-on-top model with wire shelves, but the most popular style offers 20 cubic feet of storage; adjustable glass shelves; meat keeper with temperature control; vegetable crisper with humidity control; ice-maker; and door bins.   These typically cost the least and offer more space than comparably sized side-by-sides. Widths typically range from about 30 to 33 inches. Fairly wide refrigerator shelves make it easy to reach the back, though you must bend to reach bottom shelves and drawers. Usable capacity is typically about 80 percent of what’s claimed (about 10 to 25 cubic feet), which brings top-freezers closest to their claims. Price: $400 to $1,200.

Bottom-freezer brands include Amana, Frigidaire, GE, Jenn-Air, Kenmore, KitchenAid, LG, Maytag, Samsung, Sub-Zero, Thermador, and Whirlpool. Mainstream companies have introduced high-end brand lines such as Electrolux Icon, Frigidaire Gallery, GE Cafe, Monogram and Profile, Kenmore Elite and Pro, and Whirlpool Gold. These brands cover built-ins: GE (Monogram and Profile), Jenn-Air, KitchenAid, Sub-Zero, Thermador, and Viking. You can also get built-in-style, or cabinet-depth, models from Amana, Bosch, Electrolux, Frigidaire, GE, Jenn-Air, Kenmore, KitchenAid, LG, Maytag, and Whirlpool among others. These put refrigerator items at eye level on wide shelves that provide easy access. You’ll have to bend to find items in the freezer, but you’ll typically open the refrigerator much more often. Bottom-freezers tend to cost more than top-freezers and offer less space for their size, however. Widths typically range from 30 to 36 inches. Claimed capacity is up to 26 cubic feet, though usable space is typically a bit less than for top-freezers.

While most French-door models are 36 inches wide, some are 33 inches, and some offer through-the-door ice and water. Price: $700 to $1,500; $1,600 to $2,000 for French doors. French door fridges, are side-by-side on top with freezers on the bottom and are one of the newer options on the market.

Side-by-sides are split units that have a freezer on one side and a refrigerator on the other. They’re typically equipped with through-the-door ice and water—among the most requested features—along with temperature-controlled bins and rapid ice-making cycles. Narrow doors that fit tight kitchens are another plus, though most don’t open wide enough to fit pizza boxes and other wide items. High, narrow compartments also make it hard to find items at back. Side-by-sides are typically 32 to 36 inches wide, with claimed capacity of 20 to 30 cubic feet, though we’ve found that only about 65 percent of that space is usable. They’re also pricier than top-freezer models. Price: $800 to $2,000.

Built-ins are pricey refrigerators that are designed to fit nearly flush with cabinets and counters, and typically comprise bottom-freezers and side-by-sides. Most can accept extra-cost front panels that match other elements of your kitchen. You can even buy a separate refrigerator and freezer mounted together in a 72-inch opening. On the downside, built-ins are wide (36 inches or wider), yet relatively shallow (25 to 26 inches, front to back), making them least-efficient overall. They’ve also been repair-prone in Consumer Reports’ surveys. And at roughly a foot taller than conventional models, they could be hard to fit beneath overhead cabinets. Price: $4,000 to $7,000.

Cabinet-depth refrigerators are less-shallow, freestanding and offer the look of a built-in for less money. They are available mostly in side-by-side styles, with some top- and bottom-freezers and French-door models available. Many accept extra-cost panels for a custom look, but cabinet-depth models have less usable space than deeper freestanding models and cost more. Price: $1,500 to $3,200.

Under cabinet refrigerator drawers are among the latest luxuries for kitchens where even the biggest refrigerator simply isn’t enough. But refrigerators drawers tend to be large on price and small on space. They cost little to run because of limited capacity. Price: $1,800 to $3,000.

How much refrigerator do you need? One rule of thumb says plan on 12 cubic feet for two people and 2 more cubic feet for each additional household member, but other considerations also matter. If you like to stock up during sales, or cook often for crowds, the more room the better. Side-by-side models are easiest to organize, but the smaller models have relatively narrow freezers.  In all cooling sections, look for pull-out, roll-out bins and baskets that make it easy to see everything without having to dig around, squandering energy (yours as well as the refrigerator’s!).  If you’re a serious entertainer, you may want to look into ice makers that fit into the space of a trash compactor and produce large quantities of ice daily.

Consumer Reports offers this extra advice:

HOW TO CHOOSE

Size is usually more important than style, since most new refrigerators must fit in the same space as the old one. Begin by measuring the available space, particularly the width. Include the space you’ll need to open doors, and check that the new fridge you’re considering can fit through halls and doorways.

Once you’ve chosen a type that fits your space, needs, and budget, keep these tips in mind:

Look for space-stretching features. These include split shelves and cranks for adjusting shelf height. Pull-out shelves provide access to the back of the fridge and freezer. In bottom-freezers, full-extension drawers help you find items in the rear.

Consider efficiency. Despite advances, refrigerators still use more electricity than other kitchen appliances, since they’re always on. Top- and bottom-freezers are typically more efficient than side-by-sides. Choose a model that scored well for energy efficiency in our tests.

Think twice about multimedia models. More brands are also pushing $3,000-plus models that include TVs, DVD players, and other features as kitchens become the new living room. But we’ve found you can save hundreds and get better performance by buying a separate refrigerator and flat-screen TV.

Don’t jump at package deals. While buying a refrigerator with other appliances from the same brand can save you money and help coordinate styling, you’ll probably have less choice, and you could sacrifice refrigerator performance and reliability.

Choosing Kitchen Appliances – Refrigerators

Continuing now with refrigerators, we bring you part two of our series on choosing kitchen appliances.  The features that most people consider when looking for a new fridge are storage capacity, ease of use, price and hopefully energy usage.  One of the first things you can do to save energy when purchasing a new appliance of any kind , is to buy one with the Energy Star seal.  A 2007 Energy Star refrigerator uses at least 15 percent less energy than a standard one. 

HowStuffWorks.com, Consumer Reports and Appliance.net have some tips we’d like to share with you that will help clarify your refrigerator needs.

While you’ll find an array of refrigerator brands, only a handful of companies actually make these appliances, with essentially similar models under several names. Frigidaire, General Electric, Kenmore, and Whirlpool account for some 75 percent of top-freezer sales and, with Maytag, more than 80 percent of side-by-side purchases.
You can still get the basic 18-cubic-foot, freezer-on-top model with wire shelves, but the most popular style offers 20 cubic feet of storage; adjustable glass shelves; meat keeper with temperature control; vegetable crisper with humidity control; ice-maker; and door bins.   These typically cost the least and offer more space than comparably sized side-by-sides. Widths typically range from about 30 to 33 inches. Fairly wide refrigerator shelves make it easy to reach the back, though you must bend to reach bottom shelves and drawers. Usable capacity is typically about 80 percent of what’s claimed (about 10 to 25 cubic feet), which brings top-freezers closest to their claims. Price: $400 to $1,200.

Bottom-freezer brands include Amana, Frigidaire, GE, Jenn-Air, Kenmore, KitchenAid, LG, Maytag, Samsung, Sub-Zero, Thermador, and Whirlpool. Mainstream companies have introduced high-end brand lines such as Electrolux Icon, Frigidaire Gallery, GE Cafe, Monogram and Profile, Kenmore Elite and Pro, and Whirlpool Gold. These brands cover built-ins: GE (Monogram and Profile), Jenn-Air, KitchenAid, Sub-Zero, Thermador, and Viking. You can also get built-in-style, or cabinet-depth, models from Amana, Bosch, Electrolux, Frigidaire, GE, Jenn-Air, Kenmore, KitchenAid, LG, Maytag, and Whirlpool among others. These put refrigerator items at eye level on wide shelves that provide easy access. You’ll have to bend to find items in the freezer, but you’ll typically open the refrigerator much more often. Bottom-freezers tend to cost more than top-freezers and offer less space for their size, however. Widths typically range from 30 to 36 inches. Claimed capacity is up to 26 cubic feet, though usable space is typically a bit less than for top-freezers.

While most French-door models are 36 inches wide, some are 33 inches, and some offer through-the-door ice and water. Price: $700 to $1,500; $1,600 to $2,000 for French doors. French door fridges, are side-by-side on top with freezers on the bottom and are one of the newer options on the market.

Side-by-sides are split units that have a freezer on one side and a refrigerator on the other. They’re typically equipped with through-the-door ice and water—among the most requested features—along with temperature-controlled bins and rapid ice-making cycles. Narrow doors that fit tight kitchens are another plus, though most don’t open wide enough to fit pizza boxes and other wide items. High, narrow compartments also make it hard to find items at back. Side-by-sides are typically 32 to 36 inches wide, with claimed capacity of 20 to 30 cubic feet, though we’ve found that only about 65 percent of that space is usable. They’re also pricier than top-freezer models. Price: $800 to $2,000.

Built-ins are pricey refrigerators that are designed to fit nearly flush with cabinets and counters, and typically comprise bottom-freezers and side-by-sides. Most can accept extra-cost front panels that match other elements of your kitchen. You can even buy a separate refrigerator and freezer mounted together in a 72-inch opening. On the downside, built-ins are wide (36 inches or wider), yet relatively shallow (25 to 26 inches, front to back), making them least-efficient overall. They’ve also been repair-prone in Consumer Reports’ surveys. And at roughly a foot taller than conventional models, they could be hard to fit beneath overhead cabinets. Price: $4,000 to $7,000.

Cabinet-depth refrigerators are less-shallow, freestanding and offer the look of a built-in for less money. They are available mostly in side-by-side styles, with some top- and bottom-freezers and French-door models available. Many accept extra-cost panels for a custom look, but cabinet-depth models have less usable space than deeper freestanding models and cost more. Price: $1,500 to $3,200.

Under cabinet refrigerator drawers are among the latest luxuries for kitchens where even the biggest refrigerator simply isn’t enough. But refrigerators drawers tend to be large on price and small on space. They cost little to run because of limited capacity. Price: $1,800 to $3,000.

How much refrigerator do you need? One rule of thumb says plan on 12 cubic feet for two people and 2 more cubic feet for each additional household member, but other considerations also matter. If you like to stock up during sales, or cook often for crowds, the more room the better. Side-by-side models are easiest to organize, but the smaller models have relatively narrow freezers.  In all cooling sections, look for pull-out, roll-out bins and baskets that make it easy to see everything without having to dig around, squandering energy (yours as well as the refrigerator’s!).  If you’re a serious entertainer, you may want to look into ice makers that fit into the space of a trash compactor and produce large quantities of ice daily.

Consumer Reports offers this extra advice:

HOW TO CHOOSE

Size is usually more important than style, since most new refrigerators must fit in the same space as the old one. Begin by measuring the available space, particularly the width. Include the space you’ll need to open doors, and check that the new fridge you’re considering can fit through halls and doorways.

Once you’ve chosen a type that fits your space, needs, and budget, keep these tips in mind:

Look for space-stretching features. These include split shelves and cranks for adjusting shelf height. Pull-out shelves provide access to the back of the fridge and freezer. In bottom-freezers, full-extension drawers help you find items in the rear.

Consider efficiency. Despite advances, refrigerators still use more electricity than other kitchen appliances, since they’re always on. Top- and bottom-freezers are typically more efficient than side-by-sides. Choose a model that scored well for energy efficiency in our tests.

Think twice about multimedia models. More brands are also pushing $3,000-plus models that include TVs, DVD players, and other features as kitchens become the new living room. But we’ve found you can save hundreds and get better performance by buying a separate refrigerator and flat-screen TV.

Don’t jump at package deals. While buying a refrigerator with other appliances from the same brand can save you money and help coordinate styling, you’ll probably have less choice, and you could sacrifice refrigerator performance and reliability.