August 30, 2014

Recall: Wii Battery Recharge Stations by Griffin International Due to Burn and Fire Hazards

Name of Product: Psyclone Essentials and React Wii™ 4-Dock Battery Recharge Stations

Units: About 220,000

Distributor: Griffin International Cos., Inc., of Minneapolis, Minn.

Hazard: The battery pack can overheat, posing a burn or fire hazard to the consumer.

Incidents/Injuries: Six incidents of overheating have been reported to the firm. Two consumers reported minor burns to the hand.

Description: The Wii 4-Dock Recharge Station includes a white docking station with four recharge stations and a four rechargeable battery pack. Brand names are on the front of the packaging and the model numbers, Psyclone (PSE6501) and React (RT530), can be found on the bottom side of the product.

Sold at: The Psyclone Essentials brand was sold at Target, Toys R Us and Amazon.com nationwide; React was sold at Best Buy stores nationwide. Both were sold from January 2008 through July 2009 for about $50.

Manufactured in: China

Remedy: Consumers should immediately stop using these recharge stations and contact Griffin International to obtain information on how to return the product and receive a free replacement.

Consumer Contact: For additional information, contact Griffin International toll free at 888-344-4702 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. CT Monday-Friday, email productsafety@psyclonegamer.com or visit this Web site www.psyclonegamer.com/Wii4Dock

Join the forum discussion on this post - (1) Posts

Stop Playing Games and Save Energy

We’re all trying to save money these days.  Using less energy by turning off lights and lowering your thermostat are goo ways to cut down on your energy bill, but here is a small step that can help you save a little more – Turn of your Wii, or Xbox when you are done playing.

Video game consoles nationwide use about as much electricity in a year as every home in San Diego combined, and can significantly add to consumers’ electric bills, according to a new report released by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC). Much of this energy use is consumed by machines that are left on, but not in use.

“If you leave your Xbox 360 or Sony Play Station 3 on all the time, you can cut your electric bill by as much as $100 a year simply by turning it off when you are finished playing,” said NRDC Senior Scientist Noah Horowitz. “With so many struggling in today’s economy – it’s important to realize there are simple steps gamers can take to lower their energy costs. And if manufacturers make future systems more energy efficient, they’ll be doing the right thing for consumers’ pockets, for our clean energy future, and for the environment.”

Looking at the “big three” video game consoles – Sony Playstation 3, Microsoft XBox360 and Nintendo’s Wii – the report measured the amount of power they use when they are active, idle and turned off. It found these systems use nearly the same amount of power when you are playing them as they do when you leave them on and walk away. The Playstation 3 and Xbox 360 also operate as high-definition video players. When they are used this way, the consoles continue to operate at nearly peak energy levels, even after the movie ends, unless the device is turned off.

National video game energy use is growing as more and more homes have these devices and additional features are added. The report offers solutions for individuals to cut their game console-related energy costs and offers recommendations on how manufacturers can dramatically improve the efficiency of the next generation of consoles that are being developed. NRDC is working with the leading video game hardware and software designers to help make these improvements. In particular, NRDC is working to make sure users will be able to automatically save their settings and place in the game before they shut down the systems.