November 28, 2014

GE’s Appliances for Smaller Homes

One outcome of the declining real estate market has been a move to building and offering smaller homes. It was a trend that had been suspected but earlier this year the statistics were announced that back it up. The average size of homes started in the third quarter of 2008 was 2,438 square feet, down from 2,629 square feet in the second quarter, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.1

Many consumers are looking for smaller digs for a variety of reasons. Some have made a philosophical shift considering a move to a smaller living space less of a down-sizing and more of a right-sizing decision. They choose to use less of the earth’s resources.

Others have made the switch for demographic reasons:

  • The 80 million-strong Generation Y, the so-called “millennials,” want to live in exciting urban settings, are interested in value engineering, and consider smaller living spaces acceptable.2 Urban lofts are hits in cities less populated than New York City or San Francisco– including Louisville, Kentucky; Des Moines, Iowa; and Spokane, Washington, to name just a few.
  • Aging baby boomers are selling their larger homes and trading them for more convenient patio homes, one or two bedroom homes or condos in communities where shared fees pay for property and landscape maintenance.

“Regardless of why a consumer decides to live in a smaller space, there is no reason to lose upscale features in the furnishings within that space – especially appliances,” noted Marc Hottenroth, Industrial Design Leader for GE Consumer & Industrial.

“Both GE Profile™ and Monogram® lines also offer selections that are perfect for the empty-nester who is moving to a smaller home or condo,” said Hottenroth. Monogram was the first GE product line to introduce undercounter refrigerator modules including wine reserve, double drawer refrigerator, beverage centers, fresh food refrigerator or bar refrigerator with ice maker. In addition Monogram offers a slim 18-inch wide dishwasher with stainless steel door or personalized with customer-supplied cabinet-compatible panel. Both models provide effective, yet quiet cleaning power with a five-level wash system and hidden, integrated electronic. The new Monogram 30-inch chimney hoods with sophisticated bold angles and lines, all hand-finished to seamless perfection, provide powerful venting and a striking focal point that elevates small-scale kitchens into grand statements.

Choose the Profile single double oven wall oven or free-standing range, and, in the same space occupied by a standard free-standing range or wall oven, consumers can have 6.6 cu. ft. of combined oven space. The two ovens can be operated at two different temperatures — up to 450 degrees. That’s twice as much cooking for the same amount of space.

Cuisinart’s Slow Cooker

If you just have to have the shiniest, sleekest slow cooker on the block, Cuisinart has it for you. But it’s apparently got more than good looks. It holds 6.5 quarts, more than enough to feed a family a hearty dinner. It also features a 24-hour programmable cook time, a digital countdown timer, and three cooking modes. When the cooking is done, it automatically shifts to a Keep Warm mode.

Product Features
• Touchpad control panel with LCD timer display
• 24-hour cooking timer
• Off/On, Warm, Simmer, Low, and High settings
• Removable 6.5-quart, oval ceramic cooking pot
• Automatically shifts to “Warm” when cook time ends
• Brushed stainless steel housing with chrome-plated handles
• Glass lid with stainless steel rim and chrome-plated knob
• Dishwasher-safe lid and ceramic pot
• Nonslip rubber feet
• Includes cooking rack for use with ramekins or other bakeware
• Spiral-bound recipe book with 70 basic to gourmet dishes
• Instruction book
• Limited 3-year product warranty

Of course, all this comes at a price – the Cuisinart 6.5 quart slow cooker, model # PSC-650 retails for about $100.

Small Appliance Design

In today’s economy, with consumers watching their spending, manufacturers of countertop appliances are evaluating how these conveniences are used in our homes and what will spur us to buy their brand when a new one is needed. We all want to feel we are getting all we can for our dollar.

With this in mind, many manufacturers aim to make a statement with their products to justify the price. The first step often is to start asking questions. What colors and materials are popular? How do you present controls that are functional and user-friendly? Is there a technology used in one kind of appliance that can be successfully transferred to another? Does it make sense to bring in a design firm, or have consultations with parts and materials suppliers? How could a new design bring down manufacturing costs? How can consumer opinions be vetted during the design process?
“The most important points we consider when making a new product design are the needs and wants of the customer, for example, ease-of-use and new features,” says Jo Gruetzke, director, industrial design USA, BSH Home Appliances Corp.
In the never-ending search for new product ideas, sometimes a company can draw upon a brand’s history. That’s certainly an option for the company that has a lineup of several iconic brands, as does Jarden Consumer Solutions (Boca Raton, FL, U.S.; www.jarden.com). Jarden brands include Mr. Coffee, Oster, Rival, Holmes, Sunbeam, and many others.

Another less obvious example of a nod to history is found in the company’s Sunbeam clothes iron line. Last September, Jarden introduced a hot-storage case for irons. “We got the idea for the storage case from a copy of a 1910 print ad displayed in a Jarden executive’s office,” remembers Lisa Knierim, senior director, global appliances. “The ad showed a Sunbeam Princess iron, complete with a stainless-steel storage case. One day, we suddenly realized that the box met a real consumer need. A hot iron could be put in the box immediately after ironing with no need to cool down, ensuring the iron is safely stored away from children and pets.”

Starting from this original concept, the company explored how it could develop a modern version that was safe, convenient, and flexible. It designed a heat-resistant, translucent hard-plastic case with silicone parts where the iron’s sole plate rests. Incorporated in the design is a cord storage area, while an interlocking handle and lock keep the iron secure when the case is closed. The case can be installed on a wall or door with included mounting brackets, or placed on a flat surface.

“The environmental or green movement certainly seems to have been the hot topic of 2007,” says A.J. Riedel, senior partner of Riedel Marketing Group. The rising cost of fuel, energy concerns in states such as California, and former Vice President Al Gore’s documentary, “An Inconvenient Truth,” all have pushed the issues of global warming and the environment to the forefront for many consumers.

Not surprisingly, houseware products with environmental claims abound. Energy efficiency is sometimes trumpeted, particularly when a product sports an Energy Star label. In the case of air purifiers, Stockholm-based Blueair (www.blueair.com) reports that its ECO10 Energy Star–qualified portable unit runs on just 10 W, making it nearly 10 times more energy-efficient than the minimum performance for Energy Star. Most savings are made possible by using an electronically controlled fan motor. The purifier’s HEPASilent filtration system, with low pressure drop and high efficiency, makes it possible to use low-pressure fans and still get good performance. Other environmental advantages the company points to include an easily recyclable powder-coated metal housing, nontoxic polypropylene filters, a long lifetime, and no ozone generation.

How does a company differentiate its cordless vacuums, products that are often seen as low-cost commodities? The question is an important one to multibrand OEM TTI Floor Care North America Inc. (Glenwillow, OH, U.S.; www.ttifloorcare.com).

One answer has been to mix contemporary style with rechargeable vacuum functionality in its Dirt Devil Designer Series by Karim Rashid. The line was launched in late 2006 with the Kone hand vacuum. Since then, the line has added the Kurv hand vacuum and the Kruz hard floor cleaner. Newest are the Brum, a rechargeable broom that vacuums as it sweeps hard floors, and the Kwik, a desk utility vacuum that includes a detail brush and crevice tool.

A more-technology-driven tack is being taken on the just-released Dirt Devil 15.6-V AccuCharge vacuums. The units are engineered to incorporate a microprocessor and software that regulate battery charging. The result is significant energy savings and extended battery life. The new capability was achieved without requiring much of a premium from consumers: The stick vacuum will have a suggested retail price of $59.99, and the hand vacuum $44.99.

“Cordless vacuums include a wall adaptor that charges the battery,” explains Mike Mullins, TTI engineer. “Due to cost constraints, no energy management is usually included. The main problem here is that, when the vacuum battery is charged, the adaptor continues to send power. The extra power is expended as heat. Not only is this wasteful, but the heat is detrimental to the chemicals in the battery. This shortens the battery life.

“We have taken a different route by including a microcomputer and custom software. They regulate the current draw, so that the battery doesn’t overheat. When the battery is fully charged, the power is reduced to a trickle mode to maintain the vacuum’s charge and readiness. This technology enables energy savings of more than 70% for the life of the vacuum. Because of this energy savings, we were able to work with Energy Star to incorporate cordless vacuums into their ratings. Our Accu Charge models are the first to get the Energy Star approval rating, which is widely accepted by consumers.”

It seems that appliance manufacturers are paying attention to their consumers and that if you find yourself in the market for a new coffeemaker, mixer or hand-held vacuum, you will find some new features to try out. You can read more about designing and manufacturing for today’s market here.

Appliance Odometer

Here’s more from the great thinkers at halfbakery.com.  I really enjoy these ideas.

Keep track of instances/hours of kitchen appliance use:

I’m using my CostCo rice cooker bought a few months ago for the 3d time right now; it cost $30, so at the moment, I’m right at a $10 surcharge for each 4-cup rice serving, which is pretty expensive. However, in the medium term, I think it will end up saving me money on food, by helping me meet my resolution to spend less money on restaurant meals, and I’d therefore like to keep track of how often I use the cooker. However, I only know how often I’ve used it because that number is so low; I don’t have regular “rice days” either, so I can’t just multiply Mondays to arrive at a usage figure. So: I propose an electronic odometer which clicks forward a notch for every complete cycle (for a rice cooker or other 1-task appliances) or which simply keeps track of “active cycle” times for other items which are used more as-needed (blenders, washing machines, microwaves). Knowing how often particular things are used would be good in increasing household efficiency, and would be more aesthetically pleasing (though less visceral) than carving notches each time …

I have an air popcorn popper that would be a good candidate for this gadget.  I also think it would be fun to see how often the power tools that are so important really get used.

What do you think?

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Appliance Ferris Wheel

I just came across the site www.halfbakery.com, which as the name suggests, is a site where people can share and discuss their half-baked ideas. One I particularly liked is for an appliance ferris wheel that stores small appliances under the counter and brings them up to be used at the touch of a button.

The main body of the device (and most of the appliances) remains hidden under the worktop. Ok, I’ll have to sacrifice some cupboard space, but chances are that the space was being taken up by the long-forgotten appliances anyway.

Press the ‘Forward’ or ‘Back’ button on the worktop, and the wheel whirs into motion, only stopping when you take your finger off the button.

Fresh coffee, freshly squeezed orange juice and some freshly baked bread, anyone?

There was some follow-up discussion about the cords getting tangled as the wheel turned, but I just figured the appliances would remain unplugged with coiled cords until needed.

Let’s see, mine would have the coffeemaker, toaster, mixer, food processor, blender, bread machine… it’s going to have to be a big wheel.